2018 Plant List

Below you'll find our inaugural plant list. Please use arrows to peruse list and scroll down for descriptions of new introductions.

A bit about our new introductions:

Platycrater arguta ‘Honey Moon’

The estimation of many genera rests upon the single clone of it that is in cultivation.  Platycater has been consigned to a sleepy, of botanical interest only reputation, based on the small flowers of the usual form.  Largely unknown are forms with pink flowers, fragrant flowers, and large flowers.  ‘Honey Moon’ is a charmed seedling from the fragrant, large flowered cv. ‘Kaeda’, inheriting the perfume, but with flowers thrice as large.

Podophyllum ‘Shade Brocade’

‘Spotty Dotty’ is a wonderful plant, suffering from but two problems: its patent and often limited availability.  ‘Shade Brocade’ is ‘Spotty’ crossed back to delavayi.  Smaller in stature but with similar leaf markings, it removes the patent issue and allows us to propagate, but will be in short supply in the immediate future.

 
 

Hydrangea aspera ‘Royal Lace’

A tough, hardy, clone that to date has been unhelpfully been sold here as “1401”, but demands something less clinical.  A seedling from a plant which was itself a cross of subspecies villosa and subspecies sargentiana, its luxurious foliage has been Americanized and is large, with nicely pigmented, indigo fertile flowers orbited by lots of white sepals. (Cf it’s all about the sepals).

 

Hydrangea aspera ‘Royal Velvet’

A selection made with foliage foremost, the long petioles and larger foliage suggest a red foliage H. longipes, and it’s no sepal slouch.  Distinctive, but not the easiest to propagate, so not many.

 

Epimedium ‘Patent Assasin’

We’ve been puzzling how, at a glance, to distinguish E. ‘Spine Tingler’ and E. ‘Ninja Stars’ for some time (in brief, ‘Ninja Stars’ runs, and ‘Spine Tingler’ doesn’t), and apparently we’re not the only, as the two have become confused in commerce.  Though European sources have finally corrected the cv name from ‘Sphinx Twinkler’, they have been sending the excellent but patented, ‘Ninja Stars’ as ‘Spine Tingler’, which adds to the domestic disturbance, especially as ‘Ninja Stars’ is a patented plant.  ‘Patent Assasin’ derives from a cross of ‘Ninja Stars’ (which we originally received as wushanse!) and ‘The Giant’, is virtually indistinguishable from the foregoing, with similar mahogany flushed foliage and spidery yellow flowers, runs, is patent free for open source propagation, and hasn’t (yet!) been sold under a wrong name.

 

Kniphofia ‘Sideshow Bob’

An open pollinated seedling of Kniphofia fibrosa that has proved hardy, floriferous, and features branched inflorescences, a feature that while not unknown in the genus is unusual. Easy to mix lemon yellow pokers in June with later rebloom.

 

Epimedium ‘Wine Spritzer’

Our seed sowing enthusiasm has extended to the manifold charms of the genus Epimedium. In deference to friends Darrell Probst and Karen Perkins, we’ve thus far skirted the commercial end, but make an exception here, as this plant is distinctive enough to merit a name.  Resulting from a cross between accuminatum and borealiguizhouense, it sports multiple new flushes of growth, each heavily stippled, streaked and saturated claret, with accompanying profusions of small, white, seemingly sterile flowers.  Spreading. Name in keeping with other vinous variants out there, and commemorating T’s fave effervescent elixir.

 

Hydrangea sikokiana x aspera ‘Smoked Salmon’

The Japanese species Hydrangea sikokiana offers lobed foliage not unlike our native H. quercifolia, but problematically has a nearly sepal-less inflorescence the color of dust.  We’re still playing the numbers game with this combo, but this is an interesting intermediate, with lobed, purple saturated foliage and flowers in pale salmon with more sepals than the usual.  In addition to referencing the color, the name is as a geographic tag and friendly taunt to one inspirational Hydrangea fancier in the Pacific Northwest.  You know who you are!

 

  Hydrangea aspera ‘Royal Flush’     Mikinori Ogisu’s collection of a red leaf aspera in the wild (can you imagine the luck?!) has added color to the species existing, manifold charms of elegant flower, sumptuous foliage, and sinuous, exfoliating stems.  As ever and elsewhere, we’ve been at play with it from seed and have grown out many hundreds over multiple generations and crosses. Abecedarian wise, this the is the first of our red foliage plants to be named, and though perhaps similar to ‘Hot Chocolate’ and ‘Burgundy Bliss’/‘Plum Passion’,  (certainly as compared to other, decidedly distinctive red foliage ones we are and/or will be introducing), we think this has advantages in increased hardiness (usual references are wrong about this species anyway) and better flowers-- it’s always about the sepals, and these are more numerous and deeply pigmented.

Hydrangea aspera ‘Royal Flush’

Mikinori Ogisu’s collection of a red leaf aspera in the wild (can you imagine the luck?!) has added color to the species existing, manifold charms of elegant flower, sumptuous foliage, and sinuous, exfoliating stems.  As ever and elsewhere, we’ve been at play with it from seed and have grown out many hundreds over multiple generations and crosses. Abecedarian wise, this the is the first of our red foliage plants to be named, and though perhaps similar to ‘Hot Chocolate’ and ‘Burgundy Bliss’/‘Plum Passion’,  (certainly as compared to other, decidedly distinctive red foliage ones we are and/or will be introducing), we think this has advantages in increased hardiness (usual references are wrong about this species anyway) and better flowers-- it’s always about the sepals, and these are more numerous and deeply pigmented.

Salvia ‘Harlequin’s Trident’

Add entry, repeat methodology: Salvia omeiana ‘Crug Thunder’ is a wonderful foliage plant for shade, but short lived.  Crossing it over the years has led to more durable, larger, longer- lived hybrids, and we’re not through yet.  This is an unlikely fusion of it with the obscure, pinnate, Salvia bowleyana, with compound foliage purple on the reverse, and complimentary colored flowers, opening butter yellow and quickly fading to buttermilk with purple nectary guides.